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E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Sickens 18 More People in 5 Additional States

E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Sickens 18 More People in 5 Additional States


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More illnesses have been reported in connection with an E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 53 people in 16 states have been sickened by the leafy green in the current outbreak. This adds 18 additional patients and five more states to the investigation, which was originally announced on April 13.

The number of hospitalizations remains at 31 people, five of whom developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a potentially fatal condition that entails acute kidney failure and abnormal destruction of red blood cells. No deaths have been reported.

The 16 states involved in this outbreak, caused by the O157:H7 strain of E. coli, include Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Idaho, Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington. The highest case counts are in Pennsylvania (12) and Idaho (10). Infected persons range from 10 to 85 years old, and 75 percent are female.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service has identified the region of origin for the tainted romaine as Yuma, Arizona. No single producer, supplier, distributor, or brand has been identified; therefore there is no recall at this time.

State and local health officials are continuing their investigation by interviewing those who are ill to ask about what foods they ate and other exposures before they started feeling sick. Around 95 percent of those interviewed claim to have eaten romaine lettuce in the week before they began to experience symptoms. Most also reported eating salad at a restaurant, and those restaurants reported using bagged, chopped romaine. Currently, sickened people are not reporting whole heads or hearts of romaine. If you’ve eaten this product recently, watch for symptoms like diarrhea, severe stomach cramps, and vomiting.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is advising consumers to avoid buying chopped or bagged romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Arizona, region. Anyone who has purchased this product, including as part of salads or salad mixes, is advised to throw it away, even if no one in your home has gotten sick. Instead, try these 15 fruits and vegetables that are least likely to poison you.


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


More than 100 infected in E. coli outbreak tied to California romaine lettuce

Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states.

LOS ANGELES - Federal health officials have updated a food safety alert regarding an E. coli outbreak linked to a romaine lettuce harvest in California that has now reportedly infected 102 people in 23 states. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning consumersਊnd retailers to avoid all romaine lettuce grown in the Salinas, Calif., growing region which they say includes all use-by dates and brands of romaine lettuce from that area. 

According to the FDA, 𠇎pidemiologic, laboratory, and traceback evidence,” indicates that the produce originates from California. The agency said the most recent date of one of the infected patient reports of contracting an illness was on Nov. 18, 2019. 

While no deaths have been reported directly relating to the outbreak, the CDC is warning consumers that 10 people have already developed hemolytic uremic syndrome — a type of kidney failure. 

Federal officials said the investigation is ongoing and that they are hoping to pinpoint a specific source of the outbreak. No grower, supplier, distributor, or brand has been specifically identified relating to the outbreak. 

Since the last update on the investigation was posted on Nov. 26, the CDC said an additional 35 people have been reported to have contracted the illness related to the outbreak. Reports of the illness began to come in between Sept. 24, 2019, and Nov. 18, 2019. 

A map of reported illnesses as well as a timeline of infection is available to the public for more information on the matter. 

FILE - Romaine lettuce is displayed on a shelf at a supermarket.

Anyone with romaine lettuce in their home or who has recently purchased packaged goods containing the vegetable should look for a label that indicates where it was grown. If the label says “grown in Salinas,” or isn’t labeled with a growing region, dispose of it immediately. 

Even if you aren’t sure the lettuce you have is romaine, the CDC is urging consumers to err on the side of caution and avoid any salad mix or wrap that may contain it. 

Those who have been infected are at risk of serious illness including kidney failure, and should contact their health professional immediately. 
 


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Comments:

  1. Bazil

    I can with you will accept.

  2. Antaeus

    I'm sorry, but in my opinion, you are wrong. We need to discuss.

  3. Tlachinolli

    But is there another way out?

  4. Orton

    very interesting and funny !!!

  5. Tziyon

    Thank you for the article. Delighted as always

  6. Cormic

    Can this be paraphrased?



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