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The Bazaar's "New Way" Dirty Martini

The Bazaar's


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"There’s only one kind of martini," one of my mentors, the author, Dan Okrent, once noted. "There’s a martini and there’s a vodka martini—I drink a martini."

If not to live by, it's at least a truism to drink by. Unless that is, you're visiting José Andrés' restaurant, The Bazaar, in Los Angeles. In that case, there's another martini, the "New Way" Dirty Martini.

Doubtless you've heard of Andrés' "Olives," a dish consisting of olives both real and spherified. It's a tribute to Ferran Adrià, who first made them at El Bulli, where Andrés trained. The technique involves blending calcium chloride and olive juice with xantham gum, then dropping that into an alginate water laced with sodium citrate. This forms a skin that encapsulates the olive liquid.

As cool as it is to experience the contrast, real and spherified, Andrés' "New Way" Dirty Martini takes things to the next level.

Put simply, if you're a dirty martini drinker, this has to be a checklist item. The spherified olive sinks to the bottom of the glass, a savory promise-- a concentration of flavor and brine that's noticeably absent from the gin. You might feel cheated of that flavor, or feel compelled to quaff quickly if not for the drink's other innovation-- an olive brine air. It creates a salty parallel.

The first few sips are about novelty and salt management. Then the foam disappears and the anticipation of the spherified olive takes over, a final burst of flavor and inspiration to order another.

The Bazaar - 465 S. La Cienega Blvd, Beverly Hills, CA 90048 - (310) 246-5545


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Oil is seeping past the confines of the kitchen, thanks to creative bartenders across the country. While the ingredient has been used in cooking for decades, it’s starting to pop up in new drinkable ways from coast to coast. The addition of oil to the arsenal of standard cocktail ingredients has enabled bartenders to play with textures and flavors in innovative ways. The opportunities seem vast for this burgeoning bar technique, whether tweaking the texture of a savory concoction or enhancing the flavor of a bright, citrus-forward drink. Here are some standout cocktails that typify the trend.

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“Oils I’ve used vary from brown butter, walnut oil, olive oil, goat milk, harissa oil, sesame oil to coconut butter and oil,” says Mlynarczyk, who is Birch’s bar manager. Drinks change seasonally, but one crowd-pleasing concoction to look out for at Birch is the #1, which features lemongrass-basil rum, coconut butter orgeat , coconut milk and lime.


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#1 at Birch, Los Angeles

When it comes to elevating ordinary cocktails into beyond-basic concoctions, nationally recognized bar expert Gabriella Mlynarczyk knows a thing or two about the transformative powers of oil. Not only is she devoting an entire chapter to the subject in her upcoming cocktail book, but she’s also had plenty of practice with the ingredient behind the bar.

“Oils I’ve used vary from brown butter, walnut oil, olive oil, goat milk, harissa oil, sesame oil to coconut butter and oil,” says Mlynarczyk, who is Birch’s bar manager. Drinks change seasonally, but one crowd-pleasing concoction to look out for at Birch is the #1, which features lemongrass-basil rum, coconut butter orgeat , coconut milk and lime.


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Oil is seeping past the confines of the kitchen, thanks to creative bartenders across the country. While the ingredient has been used in cooking for decades, it’s starting to pop up in new drinkable ways from coast to coast. The addition of oil to the arsenal of standard cocktail ingredients has enabled bartenders to play with textures and flavors in innovative ways. The opportunities seem vast for this burgeoning bar technique, whether tweaking the texture of a savory concoction or enhancing the flavor of a bright, citrus-forward drink. Here are some standout cocktails that typify the trend.

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When it comes to elevating ordinary cocktails into beyond-basic concoctions, nationally recognized bar expert Gabriella Mlynarczyk knows a thing or two about the transformative powers of oil. Not only is she devoting an entire chapter to the subject in her upcoming cocktail book, but she’s also had plenty of practice with the ingredient behind the bar.

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Oil is seeping past the confines of the kitchen, thanks to creative bartenders across the country. While the ingredient has been used in cooking for decades, it’s starting to pop up in new drinkable ways from coast to coast. The addition of oil to the arsenal of standard cocktail ingredients has enabled bartenders to play with textures and flavors in innovative ways. The opportunities seem vast for this burgeoning bar technique, whether tweaking the texture of a savory concoction or enhancing the flavor of a bright, citrus-forward drink. Here are some standout cocktails that typify the trend.

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When it comes to elevating ordinary cocktails into beyond-basic concoctions, nationally recognized bar expert Gabriella Mlynarczyk knows a thing or two about the transformative powers of oil. Not only is she devoting an entire chapter to the subject in her upcoming cocktail book, but she’s also had plenty of practice with the ingredient behind the bar.

“Oils I’ve used vary from brown butter, walnut oil, olive oil, goat milk, harissa oil, sesame oil to coconut butter and oil,” says Mlynarczyk, who is Birch’s bar manager. Drinks change seasonally, but one crowd-pleasing concoction to look out for at Birch is the #1, which features lemongrass-basil rum, coconut butter orgeat , coconut milk and lime.


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Oil is seeping past the confines of the kitchen, thanks to creative bartenders across the country. While the ingredient has been used in cooking for decades, it’s starting to pop up in new drinkable ways from coast to coast. The addition of oil to the arsenal of standard cocktail ingredients has enabled bartenders to play with textures and flavors in innovative ways. The opportunities seem vast for this burgeoning bar technique, whether tweaking the texture of a savory concoction or enhancing the flavor of a bright, citrus-forward drink. Here are some standout cocktails that typify the trend.

#1 at Birch, Los Angeles

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3 of a Kind: Oil Cocktails

Oil is seeping past the confines of the kitchen, thanks to creative bartenders across the country. While the ingredient has been used in cooking for decades, it’s starting to pop up in new drinkable ways from coast to coast. The addition of oil to the arsenal of standard cocktail ingredients has enabled bartenders to play with textures and flavors in innovative ways. The opportunities seem vast for this burgeoning bar technique, whether tweaking the texture of a savory concoction or enhancing the flavor of a bright, citrus-forward drink. Here are some standout cocktails that typify the trend.

#1 at Birch, Los Angeles

When it comes to elevating ordinary cocktails into beyond-basic concoctions, nationally recognized bar expert Gabriella Mlynarczyk knows a thing or two about the transformative powers of oil. Not only is she devoting an entire chapter to the subject in her upcoming cocktail book, but she’s also had plenty of practice with the ingredient behind the bar.

“Oils I’ve used vary from brown butter, walnut oil, olive oil, goat milk, harissa oil, sesame oil to coconut butter and oil,” says Mlynarczyk, who is Birch’s bar manager. Drinks change seasonally, but one crowd-pleasing concoction to look out for at Birch is the #1, which features lemongrass-basil rum, coconut butter orgeat , coconut milk and lime.


3 of a Kind: Oil Cocktails

Oil is seeping past the confines of the kitchen, thanks to creative bartenders across the country. While the ingredient has been used in cooking for decades, it’s starting to pop up in new drinkable ways from coast to coast. The addition of oil to the arsenal of standard cocktail ingredients has enabled bartenders to play with textures and flavors in innovative ways. The opportunities seem vast for this burgeoning bar technique, whether tweaking the texture of a savory concoction or enhancing the flavor of a bright, citrus-forward drink. Here are some standout cocktails that typify the trend.

#1 at Birch, Los Angeles

When it comes to elevating ordinary cocktails into beyond-basic concoctions, nationally recognized bar expert Gabriella Mlynarczyk knows a thing or two about the transformative powers of oil. Not only is she devoting an entire chapter to the subject in her upcoming cocktail book, but she’s also had plenty of practice with the ingredient behind the bar.

“Oils I’ve used vary from brown butter, walnut oil, olive oil, goat milk, harissa oil, sesame oil to coconut butter and oil,” says Mlynarczyk, who is Birch’s bar manager. Drinks change seasonally, but one crowd-pleasing concoction to look out for at Birch is the #1, which features lemongrass-basil rum, coconut butter orgeat , coconut milk and lime.


Watch the video: 3 Classic Ways to Make a Martini (July 2022).


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